Jump to Content Jump to Main Navigation

Part I The International Law of Tainted Money, 2 International Legal Sources I—the United Nations Conventions

Cheong-Ann Png

From: Banks and Financial Crime: The International Law of Tainted Money (2nd Edition)

Edited By: William Blair, Richard Brent, Tom Grant

From: Oxford Legal Research Library (http://olrl.ouplaw.com). (c) Oxford University Press, 2015. All Rights Reserved.date: 24 September 2020

Subject(s):
Regulation of banks — Criminal proceedings — Money laundering — Conduct of business regulation — Financial Action Taskforce (FATF)

This chapter looks at the origins of the international regulation of tainted money. This has its origins in laws concerning drugs, in particular the illicit production and trafficking of drugs and the connection of that trade to organised crime. More recently, terrorism, whether financed from the proceeds of crime or tainted money or with legitimate funds, has come under the rubric of the international regulation of tainted money as well. The chapter describes how the principal international initiatives in the development of international law and standards in these areas have been at the levels of the United Nations (UN) and the Financial Action Task Force (FATF). The UN conventions and UN Security Council resolutions as well as the FATF Recommendations, the chapter concludes, should be kept in view when considering proceeds of crime and tainted money. This chapter provides a framework for understanding these instruments, including their implications for domestic law and practice.

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.