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Ethics in International Arbitration by Rogers, Catherine A. (1st September 2014)

Part II Staking Out Theoretical Boundaries and Building the Regime, 10 Castles in the Air and the Future of Ethics in International Arbitration

From: Ethics in International Arbitration

Catherine A. Rogers

From: Oxford Legal Research Library (http://olrl.ouplaw.com). (c) Oxford University Press, 2015. All Rights Reserved.date: 23 August 2019

This chapter discusses the implications of a more holistic, complex understanding of international arbitration on the future of the ethical regulation of international arbitration. With a vision of the future centred on the professionals that manage international disputes and address its on-going challenges, the chapter anticipates the implementation of the ethical self-regulation among the professional collective. While such a view might seem ambitious at first glance, international arbitration is already by nature self-regulatory. A challenge, therefore, for the current crop of arbitrators would be to think beyond the present situation and take future developments in an increasingly globalized world. Undoubtedly many transnational issues that fall under the realm of these professionals will entail both political and economic cross-currents; it is time to entrust these disputes to international arbitrators on the ground that they would be responsibly and effectively managed.

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